Leah Jacobs

Leah’s MS thesis has two components related to reproductive isolation in red-eyed treefrogs:

  1. Local not Vocal; Assortative female choice in divergent populations of red-eyed treefrogs, Agalychnis callidryas (Hylidae: Phyllomedusinae)
    • Premating behavioral isolation can facilitate divergence among natural populations. The red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) exhibits strong population genetic divergence that coincides with geographic differentiation in color pattern and body size. We examined assortative mating (for local males) in two allopatric populations that exhibit the greatest phenotypic and genetic differentiation in Costa Rica. We found that females in each population preferred local mates. Further, 73% of females chose a male in the absence of any male advertisement call, underscoring the importance of non-acoustic cues in mate choice. Our mate-choice trials provide evidence that population divergence in phenotype could, in part, be mediated by social interactions.
  1. Sex in the lab: using ART to facilitate breeding in red-eyed treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas)
    • With global warming, deforestation and the advent of a lethal disease that attacks their skin, amphibians are facing a mass extinction that some scientists compare with the extinction of the dinosaurs. For my research, I propose to develop a method using hormones to facilitate captive breeding in Red-eyed Treefrogs that can have direct benefit in the conservation of other endangered and threatened treefrog species.
  1. Funding Sources
    1. Amphibian Survival Alliance Seed Grant; Spring 2015; $925
      1. http://www.amphibians.org/seedgrants/2015jacobs/
    2. Frederick and Helen Gaige Award, American Society of Icthyologists and Herpetologists; 2014; $500.
    3. Graduate Equity Fellowship, California State University Northridge Fall 2013 – Spring 2015; $1000
    4. State University Grant, California State University, Northridge Fall 2013 – Spring 2016; $6738
    5. Thesis Support Grant, California State University, Northridge Fall 2013; $1000
  1. Presentations
    1. Oral Presentation, Mate Choice among divergent populations of Agalychnis callidryas, Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists 2014
    2. Oral Presentation, Mate Choice among divergent populations of Agalychnis callidryas, The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2014
    3. Oral Presentation, Sex in the lab; Using ART to facilitate breeding in red-eyed Treefrogs (Agalychnis callidryas), The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology; Southwestern Society of Organismal Biology, 2015
    4. Oral Presentation, Local not Vocal. Mate Choice among divergent populations of Agalychnis callidryas, CSUN Student Research and Creative Works Symposium. January 2015.
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Red-eyed Treefrog photo: The Red-eyed Treefrog, Agalychnis callidryas, of Central America is a vibrant Neotropical frog that is used throughout the globe as a poster child for rainforest and amphibian conservation. Photo credit: Leah Jacobs

 

Sperm photo: Image of live vs. dead sperm under florescent microscopy. Live is green, dead is orange. Photo cred: Leah Jacobs

Sperm photo: Image of live vs. dead sperm under florescent microscopy. Live is green, dead is orange. Photo cred: Leah Jacobs

 

Leah Jacobs, injecting a male red-eyed treefrog for spermiation studies pertaining to laboratory breeding and amphibian conservation.

Leah Jacobs, injecting a male Red-eyed Treefrog for spermiation studies pertaining to laboratory breeding and amphibian conservation.

 

 

 

 

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